Panaxolyde® is the dry extract of ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) standardized in polysaccharides and ginsenosides, contained in both berries and root. Besides the well-known activities related to ginsenosides (anti-aging, anti-diabetic and adaptogenic) many studies revealed that ginseng polysaccharides have immunostimulatory activity.

Acidic polysaccharides, structurally related to pectin, are the most biologically active and confer protection against different strains of influenza virus both in the pre-treatment and during the infection (1,2).

Fig.1: Molecular structure of D-galacturonic acid, the main monomer of acidic ginseng  polysaccharides.

Beneficial effects on prevention and treatment of influenza

The action is due to the strong immunomodulatory effects of the acidic polysaccharides that are able to stimulate cells of the immune system increasing the production of cytokines (2).

Antidiabetic action

The hypoglycemic effect of ginseng polysaccharides has been studied, demonstrating their effectiveness in improving glucose tolerance, even for some weeks after cessation of treatment (3).

Fig.2: Effects of ginseng polysaccharide (GP) on the growth of influenza virus in vitro.

Specifications

Panaxolyde®-B from ginseng berries is standardized in Polysaccharides (NLT 40.0% UV), D-galacturonic acid (NLT 5.0% UV) and Ginsenosides (NLT 20.0% HPLC). Panaxolyde®-R dry extract of ginseng roots is standardized in Polysaccharides (NLT 50.0% UV) and D-galacturonic acid (NLT 10.0% UV) Panaxolyde® complies the specifications according to Belfrit project directives.

Dosage

Panaxolyde® can be used as food supplement or in association with other active ingredients for immune response support. It is suggested a dosage of 100 mg once or twice a day with a therapy of maximum 3 months (4).

Bibliography

1. W. Ru, D. Wang, Y. Xu et al (2015). Chemical constituents and bioactivities of Panax ginseng. Drug Discoveries & Therapeutics. 9(1):23-32. 2. D. Yoo, M. Kim, M. Park. (2012). Protective Effect of Ginseng Polysaccharides on Influenza Viral Infection. Plosone. 7(3): e33678. 3. J.T. Xie, Y.-P. Zhou, L. Dey et al (2002). Ginseng berry reduces blood glucose and body weight in db/db mice. Phytomedicine. 9(3): 254-258. 4. Kiefer D, Pantuso T (2003). Panax ginseng. Am Fam Physician 68:1539−1542.

Disclaimer

This article is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. All reasonable care have been used by FLANAT RESEARCH in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. All statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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All scientific data contained in this web site are for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. All reasonable care have been used by FLANAT in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Please verify with your National Health Agency before using any of the listed ingredients.